JAMES YOUNG of DARKSTAR (WARP)


Amplify Berlin June 2020

June 2020

S: How did your relationship to music begin?

AB: I feel my relationship to music has always existed, I always felt curiosity and connection towards sound. Singing has been my very first approach at a very young age, then came violin and later more instruments as piano, tabla and synthesizers. The pieces I am composing at Amplify Berlin are somehow linked to my very first approach to music practice, as they are all based on vocals. I am currently recording polyphonic compositions with my voice, accompanied by layers of violin and kicks that are like heartbeats to me. In this creative process with James Young I got to look inside myself, I got back where it all started, I feel like a phoenix, it’s like flying after dying. This really feels like a new beginning.

S: Is there any key message or value that lies at the centre of the music you make?

AB: Every record I released had a message, they were all concept albums, about illusions, freedom, spirituality, nature, magic, dreams. Most of my music has been instrumental but now that I am using my voice I am including words. I think artists communicate what they truly are, and beside being a musician I’m a poet. The lyrics of my current pieces, which I write in Italian and Spanish, can describe impressions of a moment, they can be abstractions or fictions, but I guess that they are all finally rooted into a very spiritual way of perceiving the beauty of this world, and maybe this is what I am trying to communicate.

S: How has the current crisis changed or influenced the things that you make?

AB: If you refer to Covid-19, well, I honestly think we are living in a constant crisis anyway. It had been weird to me at some point because when lockdown happened I was recording music for a short fiction I had written called “How to survive difficult times”. I speculated on a fictional world in which, due to hostile environmental conditions, outdoor life could no longer be considered, and mankind would miss nature as we know it today. Little did I know in those days that we would soon find ourselves in the midst of a global pandemic. I think it’s pretty clear to me that we are already aware of the problematic our general behaviour or habits can cause. During lockdown I got blocked in Sardinia, Italy, and restrictions were very tough, so my mind escaped into creativity; I wrote a second chapter and recorded a very minimalistic album about meditation. I found a lot of calm into mediation practices, and so I started to perceive a certain kind of utopia within this dystopic time of confinement. Within limitation I tried to relate to growth.



GROOVE MAGAZINE 
2020

“Eine weitere direkt der Covid-19 Isolation zu verdankende Klangschönheit ist How To Survive Difficult Times Vol.1 I (Rohs Records/Lontano Series) von Andrée Burelli, die man eher als Modularsynthsizer-Göttin Bodyverse oder als Andy Mintaka kennt denn unter ihrem Eigennamen. Das Album, das auf schnell folgende weitere Teile hoffen lässt, bewegt sich im schweren cinematischen Ambient himmlisch leicht und gibt Hoffnung, wenn es je welche gab.” 



GROOVE MAGAZINE
2019

“Wie zuletzt Kali Malone lotet die italienisch-berliner Künstlerin Andy Mintaka a.k.a. Bodyverse auf Beyond (Lontano Series) die orgeligen Aspekte der Klangsynthese aus. Ihre Spezialität sind dabei täuschend einfache, tief hypnotische flächig-statische Stücke, die von aufschwellendem Glissando, vom einmal quer über die Tasten rutschen oder die Katze darüber laufen lassen, wieder disruptiv gebrochen werden. (...) Alles daran ist großartig.” 



DAILY BANDCAMP
2019

“Bodyverse is the aforementioned Andy Mintaka, who helps Porcu with the label’s graphic design. Her collection I Could Go Lucid is gorgeous; opener “Pink Sunsets Were Very Calm” establishes the atmosphere early, with a soft passage of ascending notes, before adding a continuous stream of harmonious layers. Mintaka alludes to the importance and allure of lucid dreaming in her description of the album—the lack of inhibition in her dream world pairs with her internal lexicon to form a profound, personal universe of sound. This idea carries over to her compositional process, improvising while keeping the structural integrity of each work. Nothing for the recordings was planned and there was no post-production. “I became an explorer, or a traveller with an uncertain destination,” she writes.”